Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed in Peterborough

Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed in Peterborough

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Unfortunately EAB has been confirmed in the City of Peterborough. Since it has been found in regions surrounding the city we knew it was only a matter of time, but it’s still a shock.

The City of Peterborough writes in a media release from today (August 26th):

The Ministry of Natural Resources has confirmed that the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been found in the City of Peterborough. Samples collected from 3 insect traps in the south and east of the City were confirmed as EAB by the Invasive Species Centre in Sault Ste. Marie.

“We are not seeing any significant EAB damage as yet, so owners of ash trees still have the option of treating their trees in 2015”, said Paul Hambidge, Urban Forest Specialist with the City. Owners of ash trees are urged to consider treatment of healthy ash trees in good condition as a cost-effective solution that will help preserve the urban forest and the many other benefits that come with tree ownership.

Read more from the media release here…

Logan Tree Experts has been protecting our client’s ash trees from EAB for the past two years using TreeAzin, a pesticide injected into the trees. There are only 5 more days to inject ash trees this year (as per product specifications). If you are interested in receiving a quote please contact our office at 705-657-6916 or email contact(at)logantreeexperts.com

Mould on your trees?

Mould on your trees?

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lichen4Are you seeing mould growing on the bark of your trees? This is actually called lichen and it is made up of two organisms, fungus and algae that grow together as one organism on the surface of the bark of trees.

Tree lichen grows best in cool, partly sunny, moist locations.

Lichen on tree bark is completely harmless to the tree itself. The rhizines (similar to roots) allow them to attach to the bark but do not go deep enough to harm the tree in any way.

If you’re not sure what is on your tree, call us to take a look.

The Effects of Emerald Ash Borer

The Effects of Emerald Ash Borer

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On a recent trip back to my hometown of Bothwell, ON (near Chatham), we were shocked to see the devastation that the Emerald Ash Borer has had on the forests. Ash trees make up a large percentage of the Carolinian forests in southern Ontario and it is now very easy to pick them out. As you can see from the photo…. they are all dead.

Emerald Ash Borer is not just a Southern Ontario problem anymore. EAB has been confirmed as close as the City of Peterborough. The spread will increase with the recent broadening of the restricted zone, allowing little control over the movement of EAB infested wood.

The Kawartha region still has the chance to be proactive before the infestation takes hold. I often hear homeowners say, “maybe my ash tree will not be effected”. This might have been true for the Dutch Elm disease, which as a disease did not effect all Elm trees the same. Emerald Ash Borer is a pest and as long as there are ash trees, the beetle and its larvae will destroy them.

Learn more about EAB, and what you can do, from this factsheet-> Emerald Ash Borer

Logan Tree Experts promotes protecting your beloved ash trees with an injection of TreeAzin, a biological insecticide. We have been helping our clients protect their trees all summer and can continue to apply TreeAzin until August 30th. If you are interested in learning more, contact our Tree Health Care Specialist at releaf(at)logantreeexperts.com to schedule an assessment and free quote.

Emerald Ash Borer Fact Sheet

Emerald Ash Borer Fact Sheet

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Discovered in the Detroit-Windsor area in 2002, The Emerald Ash Borer, or EAB, is a non-native insect that attacks Ash trees of all ages, sizes and degrees of health.

EAB beetles are 2 cm long, metallic green colored insects. The adults feed on the leaves of Ash trees, however, it is the larvae that do the real damage. The grub-like larvae bore under the bark and feed on the tree tissues, eventually cutting off and destroying the tree’s ability to transport water and nutrients through its system for survival.

Although Ash trees infested with EAB may not show signs initially, look for thinned crowns, shoots growing from the roots and trunk, splits in the bark creating vertical cracks and “S” -shaped feeding galleries under the bark. You may also see signs that the adult beetles have emerged by the presence of “D”shaped exit holes. The exit hole is about the size of a “Q tip” and is not easily seen. Sometimes evidence of woodpeckers and squirrels can be seen where they have pulled off the bark, feeding on the larvae.

Containing EAB has been difficult as its spread has been quickened by the movement, often illegal, of ash firewood across the Province. EAB has already devastated Ash populations in southern Ontario. After failed attempts at isolating the beetle through mass removal of its food source, EAB has unfortunately been confirmed in Peterborough County and the City of Kawartha Lakes.

Can anything be done to save the Ash trees of the Kawarthas?  Yes.

Residents of the Kawartha region have an opportunity to be proactive and start protecting the Ash trees before they are infected,  giving them a better chance of survival. One option for protection is the application of TreeAzin, an approved insecticide. TreeAzin is a natural product made from Neem tree seeds. The Neem tree grows in India and many common household products such as bath soap are made from the seed extracts. As documented by the Canadian Forest Service, TreeAzin does not pose a significant risk to bees or other non-target species.TreeAzin is injected into the tree every one- two years and may only be applied by a licensed pesticide applicator and one who has been trained by the supplier of TreeAzin.

Contact Logan Tree Experts for an assessment of your ash trees and a treatment quote. Call 705.657.6916 or email contact(at)logantreeexperts.com.